Our Favorite Autism Awareness Tee

As you know, April is Autism Awareness Month.  Since I am special needs parent and consultant, “autism awareness” is a daily fact of life for me.  I always try to help people understand some of the daily battles faced by families affected by autism.

Sensory problems–including extreme sensitivity to clothing–are a fact of life for many children with autism, sensory processing disorder, or other special needs. I’ve told you before about Soft Clothing, a marvelous clothing line designed especially for children who can not tolerate scratchy fabrics, thick seams, zippers, buttons, or other features of “typical” clothing. My six-year-old son has sensory problems and, these days, will only wear crewneck cotton tees (no button-down shirts or collared shirts no matter how soft) and elastic waist cotton pants (no jeans, no zippers, no buttons). I can’t tell you what a godsend Soft Clothing has been.

So I am very pleased to tell you about Soft’s new-for-2013 Autism Awareness Tee. It features Soft’s trademark flat seaming, tagless design, and soft cotton fabric, plus a great “Understand/Support/Love” logo.  20% of the proceeds of this tee goes to support Soft’s network of autism non-profits both big and small (check them out).

You may not have any family or friend affected by autism yet, but, sadly, the rising prevalence rate means you are likely to in the future.   Please consider a purchase at Soft Clothing, a company that is not only ahead of the curve in creating clothing for all kids, but one whose purpose will become more and more necessary.

Disclosure: Many thanks to Soft Clothing for sending me “Understand/Support/Love” tees for my 2 kids.  I was not compensated for this review, and all opinions are, as always, entirely my own.

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One Response to Our Favorite Autism Awareness Tee

  1. It’s nice that T-shirts are designed for awareness of Autism. I completely agree with the sensor board’s problems mentioned in the post that it includes extreme sensitivity to clothing for many children suffering with autism.

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